Do Fish Spend Wisely?

October 3, 2020 at 4:18 pm (Reviews) (, , , , , , , )

Title: Save Money and Spend Wisely During and After the Economic Crisis

Author: Dana Wise

It’s been awhile since I regularly read books sent to me by the author or publisher in exchange for an honest review. It used to be my favorite past-time, and lately my number one priority has been homeschooling.

Honestly, I agreed to read this book because I’m a sucker for cute marketing and the author sent the request titled “Do Fish Spend Wisely?” with this jpeg:

I also enjoy supporting small businesses, which include the small presses within the publishing industry. This book is from a publishing house called Ready Set Agile! based out of Slovakia and I’m interested to see how they grow. I always try to support American businesses first, but that ideology does not limit me (thankfully) to supporting American businesses only. My true passion is for small businesses and the global market of today gives us an opportunity to support small businesses in other countries as well.

The author sent me the request because I used to review financial books for a consultant website and I have posted excerpts from most those reviews on Amazon and Goodreads. I have an outdated degree in marketing and management and took more accounting courses in college than some accounting majors, but most of what I learned was from my parents and how they ran their household, helping run a small business for nearly a decade, and life experience. I am not the target audience.

The target audience for this book would be someone who knows next to nothing about making wise financial choices. The advice is good and valid advice, but nothing you wouldn’t find in existing financial guides. It isn’t “pandemic” specific, but definitely has decent tips for surviving any recession.

It’s short and to the point, reading more like a series of blog posts, which is typically how the general public acquires information these days, so I understand why it would be helpful that it is written this way. It would be an appropriate graduation gift for that high school senior you don’t know very well and aren’t sure what they like or need. Every eighteen year old needs to go out into the world with some handy money tips.

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Rich as a King

December 8, 2014 at 1:38 am (Reviews) (, , , , , , , , , )

image003Just last month, I wrote a book review for Money-fax.com on Rich as a King. It was a personal finance and investing guide written with a whole new twist: by using tactics of a Grandmaster Chess Player.

That review, of Susan Polgar and Douglas Goldstein’s book, can be found here: http://money-fax.com/money-fax-com-book-review-rich-as-a-king/

But I didn’t want my support of their venture to end there, and I wanted to reach out to my readers here as well.  If you’re looking for an educational gift to purchase this Christmas, wanting to set some new goals and resolutions for the New Year, or just want to get started in refining your mind – look no further, Rich as a King should be in your shopping cart.

From my Money-fax.com review:

Tips like “Keep your eye on the goal of gaining the initiative and keeping it,” are easily applied to both chess and the stock market. The authors will tell you how the idea is useful in chess and explain the importance of the concept, then show you how to continue utilizing this skill when you are dealing with your money. The connections are smooth and effortless, and reading tidbits from Polgar’s chess career and upbringing makes the read enjoyable. Polgar’s experience with goal setting is incredible and my favorite anecdote from her was in regards to her homeschooling and how she learned to focus.

If nothing else, check out this cool action shot of Susan playing 10 simultaneous chess games in Switzerland.  She’s pretty amazing.

2014-11-12 20.45.31

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Pamphlet disguised as a “book”

October 28, 2014 at 1:56 am (Reviews) (, , , , , , , )

pamphletTitle: Ultimate Money Management Guide for Kids (I have specifically NOT included the link here, because I am not promoting the purchase of this “book.”)

Author: Gregory O.

*TAKE NOTE* Length: 17 pages

It’s my fault, really.  I never noticed the page length section on the Amazon.com site.  I especially didn’t notice that ebooks state a page length equivalent in that section.  In fact, I’m so blind, I had to LOOK for it after someone told me it was there.  Somehow my eyes have always skipped over it.  Amazon places it there, clear as day.  I just never saw it.

I will never miss it again.  I will always look now.

Ultimate Money Management Guide for Kids is little more than a pamphlet, and is far from “ultimate” or a “guide.”  After all, it is only SEVENTEEN pages long.

It takes about ten to twenty minutes to read (depending on your reading rate – took me roughly 8 minutes total, a good 2 minutes of that was spent trying to figure out where the rest of the book was), and though there are five chapters, they are each short enough to be included in a brochure. The kind you see at seminars or conventions. Instead of being an ultimate guide, I’d consider it a solid introduction to themes you would like to teach.

There are few steps or how-to lists, mostly just conjecture and opinion. Good opinions, mind you, but I wouldn’t feel comfortable promoting this as a personal finance or parenting guide of any kind. Instead it’s a nice conversation starter.

Free ebooks of this title were being passed around several homeschool sites a few weeks back. I consider this an appropriate way to acquire this book. But the kindle format sells on Amazon for $2.99 and I can’t help but wonder how many people have been disappointed by the lack of substance and length for their money.  Not many because the reviews on Amazon are mostly positive.  This surprises me.

In addition to it’s lack of length, there were a few editing hiccups that I urge the author to review. As a writer, I understand all too well the frequency of errant typos (my own first edition has many of them), but in a document that could be considered little more than a lengthy blog post, I’m surprised the errors slipped through.  I’m sure typos appear in my blog as well.  There might be some in this very post because I rarely go through an edit – I’m not an editor.  But I’m also not charging you to read this, so I feel in that regard I have a right to be a little lazy about punctuation placement and grammar choices.  When I start charging $2.99 for you to read my blog, I promise to edit better.  Then again, I’d never do that.

Early in the introduction of the title, the author writes, “Empowering children with good financial education will ensure that they are better prepared for life and all matter finance. It is the responsibility of parents to teach their children about money.” Indeed.  But he spent little time explaining how one should do so.

Gregory O. has some great ideas and on many points I agree with him. The book as a whole would make a marvelous opening speech for a seminar on teaching parents to teach their children about money matters, but it doesn’t stand well alone. I wish O. would have developed the topic more before releasing it as a “book” for sale at $2.99. (I know, I keep repeating this information, but it just hasn’t stopped baffling me.  $2.99 for 17 pages! What?) Lower the price to 99 cents or keep it free and I have little to fuss about, because it serves as a positive starting point for parents to encourage economic intelligence in their children. It simply falls short of what else is being produced in the industry on the same topic.

I’ll take my 8 minutes back, please.

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Freelance Writing

April 11, 2014 at 3:15 am (Education) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

RoyalPort30grnI wish this blog was a post about me receiving one of those… see Daphne, above, a royal portable from 1930.  Green, no less.

It’s not.

But it is pretty exciting.

I’m pursuing supplementing my income with freelance writing jobs.  So far, I have been hired on by Money-Fax.com and I’m enjoying it quite a bit.  Money-Fax has me writing about Kid & Family Budgeting, which is pretty perfect because I’m a homeschool mom chronically on an author budget.  (That’s code for mommy who lives off nothing.)

Here are links to my published articles, so far:

The Economics of Cloth Diapers

How to Entertain Your Child for Free This Summer

How Much Does it Really Cost to Homeschool

The more traffic my articles get, the more people will want to have me write them – naturally.  So, please, if you have someone in your life any of these articles would interest, share them.

There are more to come.  Keep checking Money-Fax.com for budget friendly pets and ways to celebrate Easter.  Browse through their site for other helpful articles as well.  They are an education service geared toward helping the public learn to improve the state of their finances.

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