Diffuse And Read – September

September 24, 2019 at 3:32 pm (Diffuse And Read) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

2 drops nutmeg
1 drop rosemary
4 drops citrus fresh
2 drops myrtle
1 drop clove

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The Still Great Gatsby

January 13, 2012 at 7:58 pm (Reviews) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Title: The Great Gatsby

Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald

Publisher: Collins Classics/ HarperPress

Genre: Fiction

Length: 140 pages

“I hate The Great Gatsby, it’s so boring,” my husband exclaimed when he saw me re-reading Fitzgerald’s novel.

“Boring!? How can you say that? Something happens in every sentence!”

Since I first read The Great Gatsby in my high school English class, I was enamored by Fitzgerald and the magical world of symbolism he weaves. I dreamed of writing something that had as much depth, as many layers. As a 16 year old, I was blinded by that symbolism, all I saw was the green light, the yellow car, the envy, the American Dream. I was caught up in the use of the names Daisy and Myrtle. I was dazzled by the colors and the literary devices.

As an adult with a husband, daughter, and home, for the first time I see the simplicity of the story. I see the story no one talks about, the one beyond the green light and the yellow car. This time I see the beauty of a narrator who is sucked into a world and is omniscient in that world, but is never quite a part of it – like William Miller in Almost Famous. This time I see the epic, but typical, sadness in a story about greed, love, and regret.

If you’re in your late twenties or early thirties and haven’t read The Great Gatsby since high school, I recommend that you do. It looks so different, but still great, from here.

*About this edition: The Collins Classics edition is a dandy little pocket paperback, and actually would serve well for students. There are definitions of words and phrases that are used differently than what is typical. I’d recommend it to teachers who require their kid’s to all have the same edition.

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